Art doll

Curtains Down on Annual Kandhei Jatra Doll Fair in Odisha’s Berhampur – The New Indian Express

By Express press service

BERHAMPUR: Khaspa Street in Silk City dazzled with an air of euphoria as thousands of people took part in Kandhei Jatra, a centuries-old annual doll fair, braving drizzles and muddy roads. The 24-hour celebration ended on Thursday.

The festival is observed annually on the full moon night of the Hindu month of Shravan, also celebrated as Guru Purnima. Considered an extension of the Rath Yatra celebrations, Kandhei Jatra is ritually attached to the ancient Jagannath Temple on Khaspa Street.

On the evening of the festival, the pedestal of Lord Jagannath is decorated with earthen toys depicting various mythical characters. The main attractions of the fair are traditional toys made of clay, cow dung, papier-mâché, coir and wood, which are widely sold with the aim of promoting traditional craftsmen in the region.

“Our selling point is almost zero but we have continued to display our traditional dolls,” said Birupakhya Sahu, a traditional doll artist. Another attraction at the fair included candies molded into different animal shapes. Although the festival is celebrated with pomp and spectacle, the organizers believe that it is slowly losing its identity which calls for the promotion of these ancient festivals which are part of the local culture and heritage.

BERHAMPUR: Khaspa Street in Silk City dazzled with an air of euphoria as thousands of people took part in Kandhei Jatra, a centuries-old annual doll fair, braving drizzles and muddy roads. The 24-hour celebration ended on Thursday. The festival is observed annually on the full moon night of the Hindu month of Shravan, also celebrated as Guru Purnima. Considered an extension of the Rath Yatra celebrations, Kandhei Jatra is ritually attached to the ancient Jagannath Temple on Khaspa Street. On the evening of the festival, the pedestal of Lord Jagannath is decorated with earthen toys depicting various mythical characters. The main attractions of the fair are traditional toys made of clay, cow dung, papier-mâché, coir and wood, which are widely sold with the aim of promoting traditional craftsmen in the region. “Our selling point is almost zero but we have continued to display our traditional dolls,” said Birupakhya Sahu, a traditional doll artist. Another attraction at the fair included candies molded into different animal shapes. Although the festival is celebrated with pomp and spectacle, the organizers believe that it is slowly losing its identity which calls for the promotion of these ancient festivals which are part of the local culture and heritage.